Sartorius Muscle Anatomy

Overview
Origin Anterior superior iliac spine
Insertion Medial surface of tibial tuberosity (insertion is part of the pes anserinus)
Action Flexes hip
Hip abduction
Lateral rotation of femur
Flexes knee
Medially rotates tibia when knee is flexed
Nerve Femoral nerve (L2, L3, L4)
Artery Femoral artery

Location & Overview

The sartorius muscle is a superficial muscle (close to the skin’s surface). It runs down the length of the thigh, passing from the lateral to medial side and across the superoanterior portion of the thigh. It crosses two joints also (the hip and knee). It is the longest muscle in the human body. The word sartorius translated from Latin to English means ‘tailor’s muscle’. The reason for this name was in reference to the cross-legged position tailers used to sit in at the time [1] [2] [3].

Superficial view of the sartorius muscle from an anterior direction

Here we can see a superficial view of the sartorius muscle from an anterior direction.

Superficial view of the sartorius muscle from a posterior direction

Here we can see a superficial view of the sartorius muscle from a posterior direction.

Sartorius muscle in isolation

Here we can see the sartorius muscle in isolation.

Origin & Insertion

The sartorius muscle originates at the anterior superior iliac spine. It then inserts on the medial surface of the tibial tuberosity. This insertion is part of the group of tendons called the ‘pes anserinus’ which insert in this region. The pes anserinus is comprised of the tendons of the sartorius, gracilis and semitendinosus muscles [4] [5].

Origin of the sartorius muscle highlighted in red

Here we can see the origin of the sartorius muscle highlighted in red.

Insertion of the sartorius muscle highlighted in blue

Here we can see the insertion of the sartorius muscle highlighted in blue.

Actions & Function

The sartorius muscle is able to perform the following actions: Flexion of the hip joint, hip abduction (moving the leg out to the side, away from the midline of the body), lateral rotation of femur (turning the leg outwards), flexing of the knee, medially rotating the tibia when knee is flexed (turns the tibia inward) [6] [7].

Innervation

The sartorius muscle is innervated by the femoral nerve (L2, L3, L4) [8] [9].

Blood Supply

Blood is supplied to the sartorius by the femoral artery [10].

Want some flashcards to help you remember this information? Then click the link below:
sartorius muscle flashcards

References

References
1 Khan A, Arain A. Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Anterior Thigh Muscles. 2021 Jul 26. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2021 Jan–. PMID: 30860696.
2 Dziedzic D, Bogacka U, Ciszek B. Anatomy of sartorius muscle. Folia Morphol (Warsz). 2014 Aug;73(3):359-62. doi: 10.5603/FM.2014.0037. PMID: 25242250.
3, 4 Moore KL, Agur AMR, Dalley AF. Clinically Oriented Anatomy. 8th ed. Philadelphia: Lippincot Williams & Wilkins; 2017.
5 Mohseni M, Graham C. Pes Anserine Bursitis. [Updated 2021 Jul 18]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2021 Jan-. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK532941/
6, 8 Walters BB, Varacallo M. Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Thigh Sartorius Muscle. [Updated 2021 Aug 17]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2021 Jan-. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK532889/
7, 9 Standring S. (2015). Gray’s Anatomy: The Anatomical Basis of Clinical Practice, 41st Edn. Amsterdam: Elsevier.
10 Arias DG, Marappa-Ganeshan R. Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Arteries. [Updated 2021 Jul 26]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2021 Jan-. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK544319/