Adductor Magnus Muscle Anatomy

Overview
Origin Adductor part: Inferior pubic ramus & ischial ramus
Hamstring part: Ischial tuberosity
Insertion Adductor part: Linea aspera & medial supracondylar line of femur
Hamstring part: Adductor tubercle of femur
Action Adductor & Hamstring part: Hip adduction
Adductor part: Hip flexion
Hamstring part: Hip extension
Nerve Adductor part: Posterior branch of obturator nerve (L2-L4)
Hamstring part: Tibial branch of sciatic nerve (L4)
Artery Primary blood supply: Perforating branches of the profunda fermoris artery
Superior portion: Medial femoral circumflex artery
Inferior portion: Femoral artery, genicular arteries and popliteal artery

Location & Overview

The adductor magnus muscle is located on the medial side of the thigh. It is a large and triangular shaped muscle and is the largest of the thigh’s medial compartment muscles. It is part of the adductor muscle group of the thigh. [1] [2] [3].

The adductor magnus has two different parts. A part which arises from the ischiopubic ramus (also known as the ‘pubofemoral part’ or the ‘adductor part’) and a part which arises from the ischium (also known as the ‘ischiocondylar part’ or the ‘hamstring part’). The hamstring part gets its name because of its similarity in structure, proximal attachment, and innervation to the hamstring muscles. The hamstring part’s muscle fibres are nearly vertical in orientation. The hamstring portion is considered by some people to practically be a part of the hamstring muscle group. Though in reality, it is not officially one of the hamstring muscles. The three hamstring muscles are: the biceps femoris, semitendinosus and semimembranosus muscles [4] [5]. The pubofemoral/adductor section is considered a part of the medial compartment of the thigh. The ischiocondylar/hamstring portion is considered a part of the posterior compartment of the thigh [6].

adductor magnus muscle

Here we can see the adductor magnus muscle in isolation.

the adductor magnus muscle from a superficial view

Here we can see the adductor magnus muscle from a superficial view.

Origin & Insertion

The adductor magnus’ puberfemoral/adductor portion originates from the inferior pubic ramus an ischial ramus. It then inserts onto the linea aspera and medial supracondylar line of the femur. The portion of the adductor magnus connecting onto the linea aspera also blends with the proximal attachment of the biceps femoris muscle’s short head. This allows the two muscles to work together to stabilise the pelvis and femur[7].

The adductor magnus’ ischiocondylar/hamstring portion originates from the ischial tuberosity and inserts at the adductor tubercle of the femur. The adductor tubercle is on the femur’s medial condyle. The insertion also connects through fibrous attachments to the supracondylar line of the femur[8].

origin of the adductor magnus

Here we can see the origin of the adductor magnus highlighted in red.

proximal insertion of the adductor magnus

Here we can see the proximal insertion of the adductor magnus on the linea aspera and medial supracondylar line of the femur.

distal insertion of the adductor magnus

Here we can see the distal insertion of the adductor magnus on the adductor tubercle of the femur.

Actions

The adductor and hamstring portions of the muscle are both adductors of the hip. The adductor portion can also flex the hip joint whereas the hamstring portion can extend the hip joint [9] [10].

Innervation

The adductor magnus’ puberfemoral/adductor portion is innervated by the oosterior branch of obturator nerve (L2-L4). Whereas the ischiocondylar/hamstring portion is innervated by the tibial branch of sciatic nerve (L4) [11] [12].

Blood Supply

The primary blood supply source from the adductor magnus is the perforating branches of the profunda femoris artery. The medial femoral circumflex artery supplies the superior portion of the muscle. The femoral artery, genicular arteries and popliteal artery supply the inferior portion of the muscle. The adductor magnus receives a vascular supply from both is posterior and anterior surfaces[13].

Want some flashcards to help you remember this information? Then click the link below:
Adductor Magnus Flashcards

References

References
1, 5, 10 Jeno SH, Schindler GS. Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Thigh Adductor Magnus Muscle. [Updated 2021 Aug 8]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2021 Jan-. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK534842/
2 Ransom AL, Sinkler MA, Nallamothu SV. Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Femoral Muscles. [Updated 2021 Oct 6]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2021 Jan-. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK500008/
3, 4, 6 Moore KL, Agur AMR, Dalley AF. Clinically Oriented Anatomy. 8th ed. Philadelphia: Lippincot Williams & Wilkins; 2017.
7, 8, 12 Jeno SH, Schindler GS. Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Thigh Adductor Magnus Muscle. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2021 Jan-. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK534842/
9 Benn ML, Pizzari T, Rath L, Tucker K, Semciw AI. Adductor magnus: An EMG investigation into proximal and distal portions and direction specific action. Clin Anat. 2018 May;31(4):535-543. doi: 10.1002/ca.23068. Epub 2018 Mar 23. PMID: 29520841.
11 Takizawa M, Suzuki D, Ito H, Fujimiya M, Uchiyama E. The adductor part of the adductor magnus is innervated by both obturator and sciatic nerves. Clin Anat. 2014 Jul;27(5):778-82. doi: 10.1002/ca.22274. Epub 2013 Jun 27. PMID: 23813615.
13 Kalinin RE, Suchkov IA, Klimentova ÉA, Shanaev IN. Klinicheskaia anatomiia glubokikh sosudov bedra oblasti bedrennogo treugol’nika [Clinical anatomy of deep femoral vessels in the area of femoral triangle]. Angiol Sosud Khir. 2021;27(1):17-23. Russian. doi: 10.33529/ANGIO2021107. PMID: 33825724.